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Polypectomy: Navigating the Landscape of Precancerous Lesion Removal

Polypectomy: Navigating the Landscape of Precancerous Lesion Removal

 

Polyps, abnormal tissue growths that can develop in various parts of the body, are commonly found in the colon.

When detected during a colonoscopy, these polyps may be removed through a procedure known as polypectomy.

This comprehensive guide aims to delve into the intricacies of polypectomy, exploring its purpose, the types of polyps encountered, the procedure itself, potential risks, and the significance of this intervention in preventing colorectal cancer.

 

Introduction

 

Polyps, although often benign, have the potential to transform into cancerous growths, particularly in the colon.

The importance of polypectomy lies in its role as a preventive measure, removing these precancerous lesions before they can progress.

This guide navigates through the world of polypectomy, shedding light on its significance in colorectal health.

 

Understanding Polyps and Their Types

 

Before delving into the specifics of polypectomy, it’s essential to understand the nature of polyps.

There are various types, including adenomatous polyps, hyperplastic polyps, and serrated polyps.

While most polyps are noncancerous, certain types have a higher likelihood of developing into colorectal cancer, underscoring the importance of early detection and removal.

 

Types of Polyps:

Polyps are abnormal tissue growths that can develop in various parts of the body, and they are commonly found in the colon.

The types of polyps can vary based on their characteristics and potential for malignancy. Here are some of the main types of polyps:

 

  1. Adenomatous Polyps:
  • Description:
    Adenomatous polyps are the most common type of polyps found in the colon.
  • Characteristics:
    They can be further classified into three subtypes – tubular, tubulovillous, and villous
    adenomas – based on their structure. Villous adenomas have a higher risk of developing into cancer.
  • Potential for Malignancy:
    Adenomatous polyps are considered precancerous, and their removal is crucial in preventing the development of colorectal cancer.

 

  1. Hyperplastic Polyps:
  • Description:
    Hyperplastic polyps are generally noncancerous and are more common in the rectum.
  • Characteristics:
    They are typically small and have a smoother appearance compared to adenomatous polyps.
  • Potential for Malignancy:
    While hyperplastic polyps themselves are not considered precancerous, some subtypes, especially those in the serrated category, may have an increased risk of developing into cancer.

 

  1. Serrated Polyps:
  • Description:
    Serrated polyps have a saw-toothed appearance under the microscope.
  • Characteristics: This category includes various types, such as traditional serrated adenomas, sessile serrated adenomas, and hyperplastic polyps with serrated features.
  • Potential for Malignancy: Some serrated polyps, particularly sessile serrated adenomas, are associated with an increased risk of developing into cancer.

 

  1. Inflammatory Polyps:
  • Description:
    Inflammatory polyps are typically associated with conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD).
  • Characteristics:
    They result from the body’s response to inflammation in the colon.
  • Potential for Malignancy:
    Inflammatory polyps themselves are not considered precancerous, but the underlying inflammation may increase the risk of developing colorectal cancer.

 

  1. Juvenile Polyps:
  • Description:
    Juvenile polyps are rare and are usually found in children.
  • Characteristics:
    They are typically small, and their appearance is distinctive under the microscope.
  • Potential for Malignancy:
    Juvenile polyps are generally noncancerous, but they can cause rectal bleeding and other symptoms.

 

  1. Peutz-Jeghers Polyps:
  • Description:
    Peutz-Jeghers polyps are associated with a rare genetic condition called Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.
  • Characteristics:
    They are often found in the stomach and small intestine.
  • Potential for Malignancy:
    While the polyps themselves are benign, individuals with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome have an increased risk of various cancers.

 

It’s important to note that the potential for malignancy varies among different types of polyps.

Regular screenings, such as colonoscopies, are crucial for detecting and removing precancerous polyps, thus preventing the development of colorectal cancer.

Individuals should discuss their specific situation with their healthcare provider to determine the most appropriate screening and surveillance plan based on their risk factors and medical history.

 

polypectomy_procedure_early_detection

The Importance of Early Detection

 

Early detection of polyps is paramount in preventing the progression to colorectal cancer.

Regular screenings, such as colonoscopies, play a crucial role in identifying and characterizing polyps, enabling timely intervention through polypectomy.

 

Polypectomy Procedure: Step by Step

Polypectomy is a vital medical procedure performed during a colonoscopy to remove polyps found in the colon.

These polyps, although often benign, have the potential to develop into colorectal cancer.

The step-by-step guide below provides a comprehensive overview of the polypectomy procedure, emphasizing its significance in preventing the progression of precancerous lesions.

 

Preparation:

Before the polypectomy procedure, the individual undergoes thorough preparation, typically involving a clear liquid diet and bowel cleansing to ensure optimal visualization of the colon during the colonoscopy.

 

Anesthesia and Sedation:

Once the patient is prepared, the healthcare provider administers anesthesia or sedation to ensure the patient is comfortable and relaxed during the procedure. In some cases, conscious sedation is used, allowing the patient to remain awake but in a relaxed state.

 

Insertion of Colonoscope:

The gastroenterologist or endoscopist then inserts a colonoscope into the rectum. A colonoscope is a flexible tube with a light and camera at its tip, allowing the healthcare provider to visualize the inside of the colon on a monitor.

 

Identification of Polyps:

As the colonoscope is navigated through the colon, the healthcare provider carefully examines the lining for the presence of polyps. Polyps may vary in size and shape, and their characteristics influence the choice of the polypectomy technique.

 

Snare Polypectomy:

For smaller polyps, a common technique is the snare polypectomy. The gastroenterologist uses a thin wire loop (snare) at the end of the colonoscope to encircle the polyp. Once the polyp is captured, the snare is tightened, cutting the polyp from the colon wall.

 

Endoscopic Mucosal Resection (EMR):

Larger polyps may require a more intricate technique known as Endoscopic Mucosal Resection (EMR). This technique involves injecting a saline solution beneath the polyp to lift it away from the colon wall. The elevated polyp is then snared and removed.

 

Electrocautery:

In some cases, particularly if bleeding is a concern, electrocautery may be used during the polypectomy. This involves applying an electrical current to the snare, coagulating blood vessels and minimizing the risk of bleeding.

 

Removal and Retrieval:

Once the polyp is successfully snared or resected, it is carefully removed from the colon. Larger polyps may be cut into smaller pieces for easier retrieval.

 

Biopsy (if needed):

In certain situations, the healthcare provider may perform a biopsy of the surrounding tissue to ensure complete removal of the polyp and to assess for any potential malignancy.

 

Post-Polypectomy Inspection:

After the polypectomy, the gastroenterologist carefully inspects the treated area to ensure there is no bleeding or other complications. Any potential bleeding can be addressed immediately during the procedure.

 

Recovery and Post-Procedure Care:

Following the polypectomy, the patient is monitored in a recovery area until the effects of sedation wear off. Instructions are provided regarding diet, activity, and any signs or symptoms that should prompt a follow-up.

 

types_of_polyps

 

Types of Polypectomy Techniques

 

Various techniques are utilized in polypectomy, each tailored to the characteristics of the polyp.

Snare polypectomy involves using a wire loop to snare and remove the polyp, while EMR is employed for larger lesions. This section explores the nuances of these techniques and their application.

 

 

Beyond Polypectomy: Colorectal Health and Cancer Prevention

 

Polypectomy is a pivotal intervention in colorectal health, but it is just one aspect of a broader strategy for preventing colorectal cancer.

Lifestyle factors, regular screenings, and awareness play integral roles in maintaining optimal colorectal health.

 

polypectomy_procedure_infographic

 

Contact Dr. Deetlefs

 

In conclusion, polypectomy emerges as a powerful tool in the prevention of colorectal cancer.

By understanding the procedure, its importance, and the collaborative role of individuals and healthcare providers, we empower ourselves in the journey toward optimal colorectal health.

Dr Eduan prides himself on his ability to help his patients to the best of his ability by embracing good listening skills, effective communication, compassion and knowledge and skill honed during years of private gastroenterology practice.

If you would like to book an appointment with a gastrointestinal (GI) specialist or would simply like more information on a particular GI topic, don’t hesitate to use our online booking form or call Dr. Deetlefs at 021 551 867. 

DISCLAIMER: PLEASE READ CAREFULLY

The information on this website is to provide general guidance. In no way does any of the information provided reflect definitive medical advice and self-diagnoses should not be made based on information obtained online. It is important to consult a Gastroenterologist or medical doctor regarding ANY and ALL symptoms or signs including, but not limited to: abdominal pain, haemorrhoids or anal / rectal bleeding as it may a sign of a serious illness or condition. A thorough consultation and examination should ALWAYS be performed for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. Be sure to call a physician or call our office today and schedule a consultation.

GIDoc Cape Town

Patient-focused GI treatments and procedures in Cape Town.

Monday-Friday 8AM-4PM.

Connect with Us

© Dr. Eduan Deetlefs, Registered Gastroenterologist, GI Doc Cape Town

Our website information is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a doctor about your specific condition. Only a trained physician can determine an accurate diagnosis and proper treatment.

Gastroscopy Unveiled: A Comprehensive Guide to the Procedure, Purpose, and Beyond

Gastroscopy Unveiled: A Comprehensive Guide to the Procedure, Purpose, and Beyond

Introduction

Gastroscopy, a crucial diagnostic tool in modern medicine, provides a direct and visual exploration of the upper gastrointestinal tract.

In this extensive guide, we will navigate through the world of gastroscopy, unraveling its intricacies, exploring its purpose, diving into the procedure itself, and addressing the crucial aspects of preparation, risks, benefits, and post-procedure care.

By understanding gastroscopy comprehensively, individuals can approach this medical procedure with confidence, knowing its significance in uncovering vital insights into digestive health.

The Essence of Gastroscopy

At its core, gastroscopy is a procedure designed to examine the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract using a flexible endoscope equipped with a tiny camera.

This instrument becomes a lens into the intricate world of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum, aiding healthcare providers in diagnosing a spectrum of GI conditions.

gastroscopy_benefits


The Purpose and Benefits

Gastroscopy serves as a diagnostic powerhouse, particularly when symptoms such as persistent abdominal pain, difficulty swallowing, or unexplained weight loss arise.

Beyond visual inspection, the procedure allows for the collection of tissue samples (biopsies), aiding in the identification of conditions like inflammation, ulcers, tumors, or infections.


Gastroscopy Step by Step

Gastroscopy, also known as upper endoscopy, is a medical procedure that allows healthcare providers to examine the lining of the upper gastrointestinal tract, including the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum.

This step-by-step guide provides an overview of what individuals can expect during a gastroscopy procedure.

Preparation

Fasting
Before the procedure, individuals are typically required to fast for a specified period, usually overnight. This empty stomach allows for better visualization during the gastroscopy.

Medication Review
It’s essential to review medications with the healthcare provider, as some medications may need to be adjusted or temporarily stopped before the procedure.

Registration
Upon arrival, individuals will go through the registration process. This involves providing necessary information and completing any required paperwork.

Vital Signs
Vital signs, including blood pressure, heart rate, and oxygen saturation, may be checked before the procedure.

Patient Consent
The healthcare provider will explain the procedure, its purpose, potential risks, and benefits. Individuals will have the opportunity to ask questions and provide informed consent for the gastroscopy.

Sedation Option
Gastroscopy is often performed with the use of sedation to enhance patient comfort. The type and level of sedation will be discussed with the healthcare provider, and the patient’s vital signs will be monitored throughout the procedure.

Positioning for Comfort
The individual will be positioned on their left side or back, and a mouthguard may be inserted to protect the teeth and the endoscope during the procedure.

Insertion of the Endoscope
Throat Numbing:  Before the insertion of the endoscope, the back of the throat may be sprayed with a numbing agent to minimize discomfort.

Flexible Endoscope
The gastroenterologist will gently insert the flexible endoscope through the mouth and into the esophagus. The endoscope contains a light and a small camera at its tip.

Visual Inspection
The healthcare provider will carefully guide the endoscope through the esophagus, stomach, and into the duodenum. Images from the camera are transmitted to a monitor in real-time, allowing for a visual inspection of the gastrointestinal lining.

Biopsy and Therapeutic Interventions (if needed)
If abnormalities are detected, the healthcare provider may take tissue samples (biopsies) for further analysis.

Therapeutic Interventions
Gastroscopy can also be used for therapeutic purposes, such as removing polyps or stopping bleeding.

Conclusion of the Procedure
Endoscope Removal – Once the examination and any necessary interventions are complete, the endoscope is gently withdrawn.

Recovery Individuals are monitored in a recovery area until the effects of sedation wear off. This may take a variable amount of time, and patients are typically advised not to drive for the rest of the day.

It’s important for individuals undergoing gastroscopy to follow pre-procedural instructions carefully and communicate openly with their healthcare team.

This step-by-step guide provides a general overview, but individual experiences may vary based on the specifics of the procedure and the patient’s unique circumstances.

gastroscopy_risks_complications

Risks and Complications

Gastroscopy, while generally considered a safe and valuable diagnostic tool, like any medical procedure, comes with its set of potential risks and complications.

It’s essential for individuals undergoing or considering gastroscopy to be aware of these factors.

In this section, we will delve into the risks associated with gastroscopy, emphasizing that these occurrences are relatively uncommon but important to understand.

Bleeding

  • Description
    Gastroscopy involves the insertion of a flexible endoscope through the mouth and down the esophagus, and occasionally, biopsies or other therapeutic procedures may be performed. This can, in rare cases, cause bleeding.
  • Severity
    Most cases involve minimal bleeding that stops on its own, but there is a risk of more significant bleeding requiring intervention.

Perforation

  • Description
    The passage of the endoscope through the digestive tract carries a slight risk of perforation or a small tear in the esophagus, stomach, or duodenum.
  • Severity
    Perforation is an infrequent complication, and severe cases may require immediate medical attention and intervention.

Reaction to Sedation

  • Description
    Sedation is often administered to enhance patient comfort during the procedure. While adverse reactions are rare, they can include respiratory issues or allergic responses to the medications used.
  • Severity
    Close monitoring during the procedure mitigates the risks, and healthcare providers are trained to manage any unexpected reactions promptly.

Infection

  • Description
    Although the risk is minimal, there’s a potential for infection, particularly if the endoscope or other equipment used during the procedure is not adequately sterilized.
  • Prevention
    Rigorous adherence to infection control protocols and proper sterilization practices significantly minimizes the risk.

Discomfort and Reaction to Scope Insertion

  • Description:
    Some individuals may experience discomfort, throat irritation, or a gagging reflex during the insertion of the endoscope.
  • Severity
    This is a common and temporary side effect. Adequate sedation helps minimize discomfort.

Aspiration

  • Description
    Aspiration involves inhaling stomach contents into the lungs, and it can occur if vomiting occurs during the procedure.
  • Prevention
    Patient fasting before the procedure reduces the risk of aspiration.

Persistent Pain or Fever

  • Description
    Some individuals may experience persistent pain or fever after the procedure, which may indicate an underlying issue.
  • Severity
    While uncommon, persistent symptoms should be reported to healthcare providers for further evaluation.

It’s crucial for individuals considering or undergoing gastroscopy to discuss these potential risks with their healthcare providers.

Providers will assess each patient’s unique medical history and circumstances, taking steps to minimize risks and ensure a safe procedure.

The benefits of gastroscopy, including its role in diagnosing and managing gastrointestinal conditions, often outweigh the potential risks.

Open communication with healthcare providers, adherence to pre-procedural instructions, and prompt reporting of any unexpected symptoms contribute to a safe and effective gastroscopic experience.

 

post_gastrocopy_care

 

Post-Gastroscopy Care

Once the gastroscopic odyssey is complete, patients may encounter mild post-procedural discomfort, such as a sore throat or bloating.

Conclusion

Gastroscopy stands as a beacon in the realm of medical diagnostics, offering a direct and illuminating view into the upper gastrointestinal tract.

As we conclude this comprehensive guide, the significance of gastroscopy in uncovering crucial details about digestive health becomes clear.

Armed with knowledge about the procedure, its purpose, preparation, risks, and benefits, individuals can approach gastroscopy with informed confidence, understanding that this medical odyssey plays a vital role in maintaining and restoring optimal digestive well-being.

gastroscopy_infographic

Contact Dr. Deetlefs

Dr Eduan prides himself on his ability to help his patients to the best of his ability by embracing good listening skills, effective communication, compassion and knowledge and skill honed during years of private gastroenterology practice.

If you would like to book an appointment with a gastrointestinal (GI) specialist or would simply like more information on a particular GI topic, don’t hesitate to use our online booking form or call Dr. Deetlefs at 021 551 867.

DISCLAIMER: PLEASE READ CAREFULLY

The information on this website is to provide general guidance. In no way does any of the information provided reflect definitive medical advice and self-diagnoses should not be made based on information obtained online. It is important to consult a Gastroenterologist or medical doctor regarding ANY and ALL symptoms or signs including, but not limited to: abdominal pain, haemorrhoids or anal / rectal bleeding as it may a sign of a serious illness or condition. A thorough consultation and examination should ALWAYS be performed for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. Be sure to call a physician or call our office today and schedule a consultation.

GIDoc Cape Town

Patient-focused GI treatments and procedures in Cape Town.

Monday-Friday 8AM-4PM.

Connect with Us

© Dr. Eduan Deetlefs, Registered Gastroenterologist, GI Doc Cape Town

Our website information is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a doctor about your specific condition. Only a trained physician can determine an accurate diagnosis and proper treatment.

Polypectomy Procedure: A Comprehensive Guide to Understanding its Vital Role

Polypectomy Procedure: A Comprehensive Guide to Understanding its Vital Role

 

Introduction

 

The journey to better health often involves a multitude of medical procedures, each designed to target specific conditions and ensure our well-being.

Among these procedures, the polypectomy stands out as a vital intervention in the realm of gastroenterology.

This comprehensive guide will delve into the intricacies of the polypectomy procedure, shedding light on its significance, the step-by-step process, and why it plays an essential role in preventing serious health complications.

 

Grasping the Concept of Polyps

 

Polyps are abnormal growths of tissue that can occur in various parts of the body, including the gastrointestinal tract.

Within the gastrointestinal tract, different types of polyps can develop, each with its own characteristics, potential risks, and implications.

Within the gastrointestinal tract, especially the colon, these growths can harbor the risk of developing into colorectal cancer.

Understanding their origin, development, and potential danger forms the foundation for appreciating the importance of polypectomy.

Here are some of the different types of polyps found in the gastrointestinal tract:

Adenomatous Polyps:

  • Adenomatous polyps, also known as adenomas, are one of the most common types of polyps found in the colon and rectum.
  • These polyps are considered precancerous because they have the potential to develop into colorectal cancer if left untreated.
  • Adenomatous polyps can vary in size, shape, and appearance, and their removal is often recommended to prevent cancer.

Hyperplastic Polyps:

  • Hyperplastic polyps are typically small and non-cancerous growths found in the colon.
  • These polyps are generally considered to have a low risk of developing into cancer. However, some types of hyperplastic polyps known as “serrated polyps” may have a slightly higher potential for progression.

Sessile Serrated Adenomas (SSAs):

  • SSAs are a specific subtype of polyps that are known to have a higher risk of developing into cancer compared to other types of hyperplastic polyps.
  • They are often flat and can be more difficult to detect during routine screenings.

Inflammatory Polyps:

  • Inflammatory polyps can occur in individuals with conditions like inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), such as Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis.
  • These polyps are usually related to inflammation and may not carry the same risk of cancer as adenomatous polyps.

Juvenile Polyps:

  • Juvenile polyps are rare and usually found in children and adolescents.
  • While they are typically benign, they can cause bleeding and other symptoms and may need to be removed if they cause problems.

Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP):

  • FAP is a genetic condition characterized by the development of numerous adenomatous polyps in the colon and rectum.
  • People with FAP have a significantly increased risk of developing colorectal cancer, and preventive measures, including frequent screenings and sometimes surgery, are often recommended.

It’s important to note that the detection and removal of certain types of polyps, especially adenomatous polyps, play a significant role in preventing colorectal cancer.

Regular screenings, such as colonoscopies, can help identify and remove these polyps early, reducing the risk of cancer development.

Healthcare professionals, such as gastroenterologists, play a crucial role in identifying the type of polyps present and determining the appropriate course of action for each individual.

polyps_in_colon

 

Symptoms of Polyps

 

Polyps in the gastrointestinal tract often do not cause noticeable symptoms in their early stages.

However, as they grow larger or become more advanced, certain symptoms may arise.

It’s important to note that these symptoms can also be indicative of other gastrointestinal conditions, so it’s essential to consult a healthcare professional for accurate diagnosis.

Here are some potential symptoms that might indicate the presence of polyps:

  • Rectal Bleeding: Blood in the stool, on toilet paper, or in the toilet bowl after bowel movements can be a sign of polyps. This is particularly concerning if the bleeding is persistent or recurrent. 
  • Changes in Bowel Habits: Polyps can sometimes cause changes in bowel habits, such as alternating between constipation and diarrhea or experiencing a change in stool size or shape. 
  • Abdominal Pain or Discomfort: Larger polyps or those located in certain areas of the gastrointestinal tract might lead to abdominal pain, cramping, or discomfort. 
  • Anemia: Chronic or recurrent bleeding from polyps can result in anemia, which is characterized by fatigue, weakness, and paleness due to low levels of red blood cells. 
  • Unexplained Weight Loss: Rapid and unexplained weight loss, especially when accompanied by other symptoms, might be a sign of an underlying issue like polyps. 
  • Feeling of Incomplete Emptying: Some individuals with larger polyps might feel as though their bowel hasn’t completely emptied after a bowel movement. 
  • Visible Polyps: In some cases, polyps might be visible at the anus or rectum, especially if they are near the opening. This is more likely to occur with larger or lower rectal polyps. 
  • Changes in Bowel Movements: Polyps can cause changes in the regularity of bowel movements or cause discomfort during bowel movements.

It’s important to emphasize that these symptoms can also indicate other gastrointestinal issues, and many people with polyps do not experience any symptoms at all.

Regular screenings, such as colonoscopies, are crucial for early detection and removal of polyps, especially in cases where symptoms are absent or not specific.

If you notice any of these symptoms or have concerns about your gastrointestinal health, it’s advisable to consult a healthcare professional for a proper evaluation and diagnosis.

 

symptoms_of_polyps


Importance of Polypectomy

 

The significance of polypectomy transcends beyond the removal of growths; it’s about taking proactive control of health.

A polypectomy, a minimally invasive procedure, emerges as a beacon of hope in the realm of gastrointestinal health.

With a focus on early intervention, a polypectomy involves the careful removal of these precancerous growths.

Detecting and removing precancerous polyps early can significantly reduce the risk of colorectal cancer.

This procedure is not only a tool for prevention but also a strategy for maintaining a high quality of life.

 

A Closer Look at the Polypectomy Procedure

 

Delving into the core of the matter, let’s explore the step-by-step journey of a polypectomy.

The process involves thorough preparation, including dietary adjustments and sometimes bowel cleansing.

During the procedure, an endoscope is used to navigate the gastrointestinal tract.
Once the polyp is identified, it is skillfully removed, and any resulting bleeding is managed.
The procedure is swift, minimally invasive, and often associated with minimal discomfort.

polypectomy_procedure


Navigating Risks and Rewards

 

Polypectomy, while generally considered safe and effective, carries certain risks and potential complications like any medical procedure.

It’s important to note that the risks can vary depending on factors such as the type of polyp, its location, the patient’s overall health, and the techniques used during the procedure.

Here are some of the possible risks associated with polypectomy:

  • Bleeding
  • Perforation
  • Infection
  • Post-Polypectomy Syndrome
  • Adverse Reaction to Anesthesia
  • Scar Tissue Formation
  • Incomplete Removal
  • Delayed Bleeding
  • Allergic Reaction

In contrast, the rewards are substantial.

A polypectomy serves as a preventive measure, shielding patients from the physical and emotional burden of cancer treatment and its aftermath.

Looking Ahead and Conclusion

 

The world of medicine is ever evolving, and the polypectomy procedure continues to advance. Researchers strive to refine techniques and enhance patient outcomes.

As we conclude this journey through the realm of polypectomy, it’s evident that this procedure is a beacon of hope, embodying the essence of prevention and early intervention.

The polypectomy procedure is more than a medical intervention; it’s a shield against the shadows of potential health threats.

Its importance lies in its ability to intercept the path to cancer and offer patients the promise of a healthier future.

By understanding the procedure and embracing its significance, individuals empower themselves to take control of their well-being and journey towards a life free from the specter of colorectal cancer.

polypectomy_infographic

 

Get In Touch

 

If you would like to book an appointment with a gastrointestinal (GI) specialist or would simply like more information on a particular GI topic, don’t hesitate to use our online booking form
or call Dr. Deetlefs at 021 551 867.

DISCLAIMER: PLEASE READ CAREFULLY

The information on this website is to provide general guidance. In no way does any of the information provided reflect definitive medical advice and self-diagnoses should not be made based on information obtained online. It is important to consult a Gastroenterologist or medical doctor regarding ANY and ALL symptoms or signs including, but not limited to: abdominal pain, haemorrhoids or anal / rectal bleeding as it may a sign of a serious illness or condition. A thorough consultation and examination should ALWAYS be performed for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. Be sure to call a physician or call our office today and schedule a consultation.

GIDoc Cape Town

Patient-focused GI treatments and procedures in Cape Town.

Monday-Friday 8AM-4PM.

Connect with Us

© Dr. Eduan Deetlefs, Registered Gastroenterologist, GI Doc Cape Town

Our website information is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a doctor about your specific condition. Only a trained physician can determine an accurate diagnosis and proper treatment.

Exploring the Benefits and Applications of Endoscopic Mucosal Resection (EMR)

Exploring the Benefits and Applications of Endoscopic Mucosal Resection (EMR)


EMR Explained

Endoscopic Mucosal Resection (EMR) is a minimally invasive procedure used to remove abnormal or precancerous growths, known as lesions, from the digestive tract. 

It is commonly performed in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, including the esophagus, stomach, and colon. 

During an EMR, an endoscope, a flexible tube with a camera and specialized tools, is inserted through the mouth or anus and carefully advanced to the area of concern. 

The endoscope allows the doctor to visualize the lesion and perform the resection. 

EMR is typically performed under sedation to ensure patient comfort. It offers several advantages, including minimal incisions, faster recovery time, and reduced risk of complications compared to traditional surgical methods. 

EMR is commonly used to remove early-stage cancers, precancerous polyps, or other abnormal growths in the digestive tract. It also allows doctors to obtain tissue samples for further analysis and staging. 

After the procedure, patients may experience mild discomfort or temporary side effects such as bloating or a sore throat. 

Most individuals can resume their normal activities within a few days. 


Benefits

Raising awareness about Endoscopic Mucosal Resection (EMR) and its potential benefits is crucial for several reasons:

Early Detection and Treatment:
By increasing awareness about EMR, individuals and healthcare providers can recognize the importance of early detection and treatment of gastrointestinal abnormalities. 

EMR allows for the removal of precancerous lesions and early-stage cancers, which can greatly improve patient outcomes and increase the chances of a complete cure.

Minimally Invasive Alternative:
EMR offers a less invasive alternative to traditional surgical methods for the removal of abnormal growths in the digestive tract. 

By highlighting the potential benefits of EMR, individuals may feel more comfortable and informed when considering treatment options, ultimately leading to better-informed decisions. 

Reduced Risk and Faster Recovery:
EMR is associated with a reduced risk of complications compared to traditional surgery. By raising awareness about EMR, patients can understand that this minimally invasive procedure often results in shorter hospital stays, faster recovery times, and less post-operative discomfort. 

By raising awareness about EMR, the importance of regular screenings and early intervention can be emphasized, leading to better public health outcomes.

Overall, raising awareness about EMR and its potential benefits is essential to promote early detection, informed decision-making, and improved patient outcomes. 

endoscopic_mucosal_resection_benefits


Applications of EMR

Endoscopic Mucosal Resection (EMR) can be performed in various areas of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, depending on the location of the abnormal or precancerous growths. 

Here is a discussion of the different GI areas where EMR can be performed:

  1. Esophagus: EMR can be utilized in the esophagus to remove abnormal growths, such as early-stage esophageal cancer or precancerous lesions called Barrett’s esophagus. It allows for the targeted removal of these lesions while preserving the healthy surrounding tissue.
  2. Stomach: In the stomach, EMR can be employed to remove early-stage gastric cancers or precancerous gastric polyps. It enables the gastroenterologist to precisely resect the abnormal tissue, minimizing the risk of leaving any cancerous cells behind.
  3. Colon: EMR is commonly performed in the colon to remove polyps or abnormal growths. Colon polyps, including adenomas, are considered precursors to colorectal cancer. EMR can effectively remove these polyps during the procedure, reducing the risk of progression to cancer.
  4. Rectum: EMR can be used in the rectum to remove abnormal growths, such as rectal polyps or early-stage rectal cancer. It allows for targeted removal while preserving the functionality of the rectum.

The decision to perform EMR in a particular area is typically based on a thorough evaluation by a gastroenterologist or an endoscopist, considering factors such as the patient’s medical history, overall health, and individual circumstances.


Procedure Explained

Preparing for Endoscopic Mucosal Resection (EMR) involves a few important steps to ensure the procedure goes smoothly and safely.

Here are some common preparations:  

  • Preparation: Before the procedure, the patient is given instructions on how to prepare, which may include dietary restrictions and bowel preparation to ensure the colon or digestive tract is clear.
  • Anesthesia and Sedation: EMR is usually performed under conscious sedation or general anesthesia, depending on the specific case and patient’s needs. This helps ensure patient comfort during the procedure.
  • Insertion of the Endoscope: The gastroenterologist inserts a flexible tube called an endoscope through the mouth or anus, depending on the location being treated. The endoscope has a light and camera on its tip, allowing the doctor to visualize the area of interest.
  • Inspection and Marking: The doctor carefully move the endoscope along the digestive tract, inspecting the lining for any abnormal or suspicious areas. If a lesion is identified, it is marked using various methods, such as tattooing or injection of a dye, to ensure accurate targeting during the resection.
  • Injection and Lift: In some cases, a saline solution or specialized fluid may be injected underneath the lesion. This lifts the lesion from the surrounding tissue, making it easier to remove during the resection.
  • Resection: The gastroenterologist utilizes specialized tools, such as a snare or a cap-assisted device, to remove the lesion. With snare resection, a looped wire snare is placed around the base of the lesion, tightened, and then cut to remove the lesion. With cap-assisted resection, a cap is used to create suction and lift the lesion, allowing for its removal.
  • Hemostasis and Pathology: After the resection, the doctor ensures hemostasis, meaning any bleeding is stopped or controlled. Tissue samples or biopsies may also be taken for further analysis by a pathologist to determine the nature of the lesion and provide a diagnosis.
  • Recovery and Post-Procedure Care: Once the procedure is complete, the patient is taken to a recovery area to gradually awaken from sedation. Post-procedure care instructions are provided, including any dietary restrictions, medication guidelines, and potential side effects to watch for.

It’s important to note that the specific steps may vary depending on the location and complexity of the lesion being treated, as well as the equipment and techniques used by the gastroenterologist. 

The procedure is typically performed by experienced healthcare professionals specialized in endoscopy and gastroenterology.

emr_preparation


Preparation

Preparing for Endoscopic Mucosal Resection (EMR) involves a few important steps to ensure the procedure goes smoothly and safely.

Here are some common preparations:

  1. Consultation and Medical History: You will have an initial consultation with your gastroenterologist to discuss the procedure and your medical history. Be prepared to provide information about any allergies, medications you are currently taking, and any previous surgeries or medical conditions.
  2. Dietary Restrictions: Your doctor will provide specific instructions regarding dietary restrictions prior to the procedure. This typically includes avoiding solid foods for a certain period of time before the procedure and consuming only clear liquids such as water, broth, and juices.
  3. Bowel Preparation: To ensure a clear view of the digestive tract, you may be required to undergo bowel preparation. This involves taking laxatives or a special solution to help cleanse the colon and remove any stool. Your doctor will provide detailed instructions on how to properly prepare, including the timing and dosage of the preparation.
  4. Medication Adjustments: Inform your doctor about any medications you are currently taking, including prescription medications, over-the-counter drugs, and supplements. Some medications may need to be temporarily discontinued or adjusted prior to the procedure, especially blood-thinning medications or those that can interfere with the procedure.
  5. Fasting: You will be instructed to fast for a certain period of time before the procedure. This typically means no food or drink for several hours beforehand to ensure an empty stomach and reduce the risk of complications during sedation.
  6. Transportation: Due to the use of sedation during the procedure, it is important to arrange for someone to accompany you and drive you home afterward. Sedation can impair your judgment and reflexes, making it unsafe to drive or operate machinery.
  7. Clarify Doubts: If you have any questions or concerns about the procedure or the preparation process, make sure to address them with your healthcare provider before the scheduled date.

It is essential to follow the specific instructions provided by your doctor regarding preparation for EMR. Proper preparation helps to ensure the best possible outcome of the procedure and reduces the risk of complications.

benefits_of_endoscopic_mucosal_resection_emr

 

Contact Dr. Deetlefs

Dr Eduan prides himself on his ability to help his patients to the best of his ability by embracing good listening skills, effective communication, compassion, and knowledge, and skill honed during years of private gastroenterology practice.

If you would like to book an appointment with a gastrointestinal (GI) specialist or would simply like more information on a particular GI topic, don’t hesitate to use our online booking form or call Dr. Deetlefs at 021 551 867.  

DISCLAIMER: PLEASE READ CAREFULLY

The information on this website is to provide general guidance. In no way does any of the information provided reflect definitive medical advice and self-diagnoses should not be made based on information obtained online. It is important to consult a Gastroenterologist or medical doctor regarding ANY and ALL symptoms or signs including, but not limited to: abdominal pain, haemorrhoids or anal / rectal bleeding as it may a sign of a serious illness or condition. A thorough consultation and examination should ALWAYS be performed for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. Be sure to call a physician or call our office today and schedule a consultation.

GIDoc Cape Town

Patient-focused GI treatments and procedures in Cape Town.

Monday-Friday 8AM-4PM.

Connect with Us

© Dr. Eduan Deetlefs, Registered Gastroenterologist, GI Doc Cape Town

Our website information is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a doctor about your specific condition. Only a trained physician can determine an accurate diagnosis and proper treatment.

Ironing Out the Details: A Comprehensive Guide to Iron Deficiency Anemia

Ironing Out the Details: A Comprehensive Guide to Iron Deficiency Anemia

Overview

 

Iron deficiency anemia is one of the most common nutritional deficiencies worldwide, affecting millions of people.

Although it’s a condition often associated with fatigue, it presents a range of symptoms and can significantly affect an individual’s quality of life.

This blog post aims to delve into the causes, symptoms, and treatments of iron deficiency anemia, helping you understand this prevalent condition better.

 

What is Iron Deficiency Anemia?

 

Iron deficiency anemia is a condition characterized by a lack of healthy red blood cells due to insufficient iron in the body.

Iron is crucial for producing hemoglobin, a protein in red blood cells that enables them to carry oxygen around the body.

When your body lacks iron, it cannot produce enough hemoglobin, leading to decreased oxygen supply to your tissues, causing symptoms like fatigue, weakness, and difficulty concentrating.

 

Causes of Iron Deficiency Anemia

 

Several factors can lead to iron deficiency anemia:

  • Inadequate dietary intake: Our primary source of iron is our diet. Foods rich in iron include meat, eggs, green leafy vegetables, and iron-fortified cereals. A diet lacking these can result in an iron deficiency. 
  • Absorption issues: Conditions such as celiac disease or surgical procedures that remove parts of the stomach or small intestine can hinder the body’s ability to absorb iron efficiently. 
  • Pregnancy: Pregnant women require significantly more iron to support their growing babies and the increase in their blood volume. Without adequate iron supplementation, this could lead to deficiency. 
  • Blood loss: Conditions that cause blood loss, such as heavy menstrual periods or chronic diseases like peptic ulcers and colorectal cancer, can deplete the body’s iron stores.

 

iron_deficiency_anemia_symptoms

 

Symptoms of Iron Deficiency Anemia

 

Iron deficiency anemia manifests in various ways, including:

  • Fatigue and weakness: This is often the first sign of anemia, as your tissues aren’t getting enough oxygen, causing you to feel constantly tired or weak. 
  • Pale skin: Hemoglobin gives skin its rosy color, so low levels can cause your skin to become lighter. 
  • Shortness of breath: This symptom occurs because your body attempts to increase oxygen delivery to your tissues. 
  • Headaches and dizziness: Insufficient oxygen reaching the brain can cause these symptoms. 
  • Unusual cravings: Some people with iron deficiency anemia develop cravings for non-food items like ice or dirt, a condition known as pica. 
  • Restless legs syndrome: Some people with iron deficiency experience an overwhelming urge to move their legs, particularly at night.

Diagnosing Iron Deficiency Anemia



Iron deficiency anemia is diagnosed through a combination of medical history, physical examination, and laboratory tests.

Here are the typical steps in diagnosing this condition:

Medical History and Physical Examination:
Your doctor will start by asking about your symptoms, diet, family history, and any medicines you’re taking. They will also conduct a physical examination to look for signs of iron deficiency anemia such as pale skin, a fast or irregular heartbeat, or a swollen tongue.

Blood Tests:
The main diagnostic tool for iron deficiency anemia is blood testing.

Here are some of the most common tests used:

Complete Blood Count (CBC):
This test measures different components of your blood, including hemoglobin and hematocrit levels, as well as the size and shape of your red blood cells. In iron deficiency anemia, the hemoglobin level is low, and the red blood cells are usually smaller and paler than normal.

Serum Iron and Ferritin Tests: These tests measure the amount of iron in your blood and the amount of stored iron in your body, respectively. Both are typically low in iron deficiency anemia.

Transferrin Level and Total Iron-Binding Capacity (TIBC): Transferrin is a protein that carries iron in your blood, and TIBC measures how well your body can bind iron. In iron deficiency anemia, transferrin levels are high and TIBC is increased, as your body tries to maximize iron uptake.

Further Testing: If the cause of your iron deficiency anemia isn’t clear, your doctor might recommend further testing. This could include endoscopy to check for sources of internal bleeding, colonoscopy to look for bleeding in the colon, or tests to look for celiac disease, which can interfere with the absorption of iron from your diet.

Remember that iron deficiency anemia is a treatable condition, but it’s important to identify and address the underlying cause.

If you suspect you have iron deficiency anemia, it’s important to consult a healthcare provider for a proper diagnosis and treatment plan.

anemia_diagnosis

 

Dealing With Iron Deficiency on A Daily Basis

Living with iron deficiency anemia can be challenging due to the fatigue and other symptoms associated with the condition.

Here are some strategies to manage and cope with iron deficiency anemia on a daily basis:

Follow your treatment plan: Adhere to the treatment plan set out by your doctor. This might include taking iron supplements, eating an iron-rich diet, or treating underlying medical conditions. Make sure to keep all medical appointments and contact your healthcare provider if you experience any problems with your treatment.

Eat a balanced, iron-rich diet: Include iron-rich foods in your daily diet. Lean meats, poultry, fish, iron-fortified cereals and breads, dark green leafy vegetables, beans, and lentils are all excellent sources of dietary iron. Foods high in vitamin C, such as citrus fruits, strawberries, and bell peppers, can help enhance iron absorption.

Limit intake of foods that hinder iron absorption: Certain foods and beverages, such as coffee, tea, dairy products, whole grains, and some legumes, can inhibit iron absorption if consumed at the same time as iron-rich foods or supplements.

Exercise regularly: Although it may be challenging when you’re feeling fatigued, regular moderate exercise can help stimulate your appetite, promote good sleep, and boost your energy levels. Start small and gradually increase your activity as your energy levels improve.

Stay hydrated: Drinking plenty of fluids can help combat symptoms of fatigue and help with the constipation that can sometimes occur with iron supplements.

Manage stress: Chronic stress can exacerbate symptoms of anemia. Techniques such as mindfulness, deep breathing, yoga, and other relaxation exercises can help manage stress levels.

Monitor your menstrual cycle: If you are a woman with heavy menstrual bleeding, discuss this with your doctor, as it can contribute to iron deficiency anemia. There may be treatment options to manage heavy periods.

Stay connected with your healthcare team: Regular follow-ups with your healthcare provider are essential to monitor your condition and adjust treatment as needed.

Remember that recovery from iron deficiency anemia often takes time and requires consistent effort. Over time, with consistent treatment and healthy lifestyle habits, you should see improvement in your symptoms.

 

iron_deficiency_anemia_guide_infogrpahic

 

Conclusion


Despite the challenges, it is reassuring to know that iron deficiency anemia is generally treatable, and most individuals experience a significant improvement in their symptoms with appropriate management.

By adhering to recommended treatments, maintaining an iron-rich diet, and staying connected with their healthcare providers, individuals with this condition can lead a healthy, fulfilling life.

For any additional information regarding iron deficiency anemia, it’s best to find a trusted and experienced Gastroenterologist who can answer your questions clearly, recommend appropriate solutions, and perform tests with precision and expertise.

Dr. Deetlefs has earned the reputation of a trusted health expert providing consultative, diagnostic, and therapeutic endoscopic and related services to patients in Cape Town and beyond.

Dr Eduan prides himself on his ability to help his patients to the best of his ability by embracing good listening skills, effective communication, compassion and knowledge and skill honed during years of private gastroenterology practice.

If you would like to book an appointment with a gastrointestinal (GI) specialist or would simply like more information on a particular GI topic, don’t hesitate to use our online booking form
or call Dr. Deetlefs at 021 551 867.

DISCLAIMER: PLEASE READ CAREFULLY

The information on this website is to provide general guidance. In no way does any of the information provided reflect definitive medical advice and self-diagnoses should not be made based on information obtained online. It is important to consult a Gastroenterologist or medical doctor regarding ANY and ALL symptoms or signs including, but not limited to: abdominal pain, haemorrhoids or anal / rectal bleeding as it may a sign of a serious illness or condition. A thorough consultation and examination should ALWAYS be performed for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. Be sure to call a physician or call our office today and schedule a consultation.

GIDoc Cape Town

Patient-focused GI treatments and procedures in Cape Town.

Monday-Friday 8AM-4PM.

Connect with Us

© Dr. Eduan Deetlefs, Registered Gastroenterologist, GI Doc Cape Town

Our website information is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a doctor about your specific condition. Only a trained physician can determine an accurate diagnosis and proper treatment.

Unraveling the Mystery of Crohn’s Disease: Causes, Symptoms, and Insights

Unraveling the Mystery of Crohn’s Disease: Causes, Symptoms, and Insights

Gain a better understanding of Crohn’s disease, a chronic inflammatory bowel condition that can affect various parts of the digestive tract.

Delve into the potential causes, common symptoms, and the diagnostic process to understand this complex autoimmune disorder better.

What is Crohn’s Disease?

Crohn’s disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that affects the lining of the digestive tract, also known as the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.

It can involve any part of the GI tract from the mouth to the anus, but it most commonly affects the end of the small intestine (ileum) and the beginning of the large intestine (colon).

The inflammation caused by Crohn’s disease can penetrate deep into the layers of the affected bowel tissue, leading to pain, discomfort, and various digestive symptoms.

The inflammation can also cause complications such as strictures (narrowing of the intestine), fistulas (abnormal connections between different parts of the intestine or between the intestine and other organs), and abscesses (pockets of infection).

Causes and Risk Factors

The exact cause of Crohn’s disease is still not completely understood, but it is believed to result from a complex interplay of genetic, environmental, and immune system factors.

Here are some of the known causes and risk factors associated with Crohn’s disease:

Genetics:
There is a clear genetic component to Crohn’s disease, as individuals with a family history of the condition are more likely to develop it. Several genes have been identified that may increase the risk of developing Crohn’s disease, but not everyone who carries these genes will develop the condition.
 

Immune system:
Crohn’s disease is considered an autoimmune disorder, in which the immune system mistakenly attacks healthy cells in the gastrointestinal tract. This immune response leads to chronic inflammation and tissue damage. The exact reason for this abnormal immune response is not fully understood, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

Environmental factors:
Although the exact environmental triggers of Crohn’s disease are not known, several factors have been associated with an increased risk of developing the condition. These factors include smoking and having a diet high in fat and low in fiber. It has also been suggested that infections, particularly those involving the gastrointestinal tract, may play a role in triggering Crohn’s disease in susceptible individuals.

Age:
Crohn’s disease can occur at any age, but it is most commonly diagnosed in young adults between the ages of 15 and 35. However, it is important to note that the condition can develop later in life as well.

Smoking:
Smoking is a significant risk factor for the development of Crohn’s disease and is also associated with more severe disease and a higher risk of complications. Quitting smoking can help reduce the risk of developing the condition and improve the overall health of those who already have it.

crohns_symptoms

Common Symptoms of Crohn’s

The symptoms of Crohn’s disease can vary widely depending on the severity of inflammation and the specific parts of the digestive tract affected. Some common symptoms associated with Crohn’s disease include:

Abdominal Pain and Cramping:
This is often experienced in the lower right part of the abdomen but can occur anywhere along the digestive tract. The pain may be mild to severe and can come and go, often worsening after meals.

Diarrhea:
Frequent loose and watery stools are a common symptom of Crohn’s disease. In some cases, diarrhea may be severe and accompanied by blood or mucus.

Fatigue:
People with Crohn’s disease often experience a general feeling of tiredness and low energy levels due to inflammation, malabsorption of nutrients, and the impact of other symptoms on daily life.

Weight loss:
Unintentional weight loss can result from a combination of reduced appetite, malabsorption of nutrients, and increased calorie expenditure due to the ongoing inflammation in the digestive tract.

Fever:
A low-grade fever can sometimes accompany active inflammation in Crohn’s disease, particularly during flare-ups.

Mouth sores:
Painful sores, or ulcers, can develop in the mouth as a result of inflammation in the digestive tract.

Perianal disease:
This includes symptoms like pain, swelling, or drainage around the anus, which can result from the formation of abscesses, fissures, or fistulas.

Nutritional deficiencies:
Crohn’s disease can cause malabsorption of nutrients, leading to deficiencies in essential vitamins and minerals such as iron, vitamin B12, and vitamin D.

Joint pain:
Arthritis or joint pain can occur in some individuals with Crohn’s disease, affecting the knees, ankles, wrists, or other joints.

Skin issues:
Some people with Crohn’s disease may develop skin problems, such as erythema nodosum (painful red nodules under the skin) or pyoderma gangrenosum (painful ulcers that develop rapidly).


Eye inflammation:
Inflammation of the eyes, such as uveitis or episcleritis, can also be a symptom of Crohn’s disease.

crohns_diagnosis_and_testing

 

Diagnosis and Testing

Diagnosing Crohn’s disease can be challenging due to its varied symptoms and the fact that it can mimic other gastrointestinal conditions.

A combination of medical history, physical examination, and various tests and procedures is often required to accurately diagnose Crohn’s disease.

Here are some of the common steps and tests involved in diagnosing the condition:

Medical History and Physical Examination:
The physician will begin by taking a detailed medical history, including information about symptoms, family history of Crohn’s disease or other gastrointestinal disorders, and any medications the patient is taking. A physical examination will follow, focusing on signs of inflammation, malnutrition, or complications related to Crohn’s disease.

Blood Tests:
Blood tests can help identify signs of inflammation, anemia, and possible nutritional deficiencies. Common blood tests include complete blood count (CBC), C-reactive protein (CRP), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR).

Stool Tests:
Stool samples may be analyzed to rule out other causes of gastrointestinal symptoms, such as infections or parasites. The presence of fecal calprotectin, a protein that indicates inflammation in the intestines, can also be detected in stool samples and may be a marker for Crohn’s disease.

Imaging Studies:
Various imaging tests can help visualize the gastrointestinal tract and identify areas of inflammation, strictures, or other abnormalities. These tests may include X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or ultrasound.
 

Endoscopy:
Endoscopic procedures involve inserting a flexible tube with a camera at its tip into the gastrointestinal tract to directly visualize the lining of the digestive tract and take biopsies (tissue samples) for further analysis. Two common endoscopic procedures used in diagnosing Crohn’s disease are:

Colonoscopy:
This procedure allows the physician to examine the entire colon and the end of the small intestine (ileum). Biopsies can be taken during a colonoscopy to help confirm the diagnosis.

upper_endoscopy_procedure

Upper endoscopy:
This procedure is used to examine the esophagus, stomach, and the first part of the small intestine (duodenum). It may be performed if symptoms suggest Crohn’s disease is affecting the upper gastrointestinal tract.

Capsule endoscopy:
In some cases, a capsule endoscopy may be recommended to visualize the small intestine, which can be difficult to examine using conventional endoscopy. The patient swallows a small capsule containing a camera, which takes pictures of the digestive tract as it passes through, transmitting the images to a recording device worn by the patient.

mystery_of_crohns_infographic

Conclusion

Dr. Deetlefs has earned the reputation of a trusted health expert providing consultative, diagnostic, and therapeutic endoscopic and related services to patients in Cape Town and beyond.

Dr Eduan prides himself on his ability to help his patients to the best of his ability by embracing good listening skills, effective communication, compassion and knowledge and skill honed during years of private gastroenterology practice.

If you would like to book an appointment with a gastrointestinal (GI) specialist or would simply like more information on a particular GI topic, don’t hesitate to use our online booking form
or call Dr. Deetlefs at 021 551 867. 

DISCLAIMER: PLEASE READ CAREFULLY

The information on this website is to provide general guidance. In no way does any of the information provided reflect definitive medical advice and self-diagnoses should not be made based on information obtained online. It is important to consult a Gastroenterologist or medical doctor regarding ANY and ALL symptoms or signs including, but not limited to: abdominal pain, haemorrhoids or anal / rectal bleeding as it may a sign of a serious illness or condition. A thorough consultation and examination should ALWAYS be performed for an accurate diagnosis and treatment plan. Be sure to call a physician or call our office today and schedule a consultation.

GIDoc Cape Town

Patient-focused GI treatments and procedures in Cape Town.

Monday-Friday 8AM-4PM.

Connect with Us

© Dr. Eduan Deetlefs, Registered Gastroenterologist, GI Doc Cape Town

Our website information is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please consult a doctor about your specific condition. Only a trained physician can determine an accurate diagnosis and proper treatment.